Make your own Terrarium in 7 Steps

Terrariums have grown in popularity over the past few years, and it's easy to see why. They are a great way to bring a miniature version of the outdoors inside and they are quite low maintenance. They come in all shapes and sizes and can be styled to your taste. But best of all is they are super fun to make!

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WHAT YOU NEED:

  •     a clear glass vessel
  •     perlite
  •     activated charcoal
  •     sphagnum moss
  •     succulent and cactus potting soil
  •     selection of succulents and cacti
  •     a pair of gloves
  •     a spoon
  •     rocks, pebbles or recycled glass chunks

 

PUTTING IT TOGETHER

STEP 1

Begin by filling the bottom of your container with a 1-2cm layer of perlite. The perlite acts as drainage and collects any water that reaches the bottom of your container. It also makes a nice contrast to the other darker layers. 

STEP 2

Pour a thin layer of activated charcoal on top of the perlite. Activated Charcoal helps clean the air of your terrarium and refreshes the soil. Perfect when used for a closed top terrarium.

STEP 3

Add a layer of Sphagnum moss across the charcoal layer. This will act as a filtration system and stop potting mix from falling into the drainage area. 

STEP 4

Add a layer of soil ensuring it is deep enough to cover the roots of each plant.

Terrarium

STEP 5

Remove your plants from their containers and brush off the loose soil around the roots.

STEP 6

One by one using the end of a spoon make a hole big enough for the roots and place the plant inside. Firmly tamp the soil down to hold each plant in place.

STEP 7 (OPTIONAL)

If you would like you can top of your terrarium with more sphagnum moss, some sand or pebbles or even some small figurines.

 

HOW TO LOOK AFTER YOUR TERRARIUM

  • Lightly water once per week in summer and once per fortnight in winter, watering only the live plants and avoiding mosses. For an open terrarium, the soil should always remain barely moist, never bone dry.
  • Prune back dead foliage or overgrown plants as needed to prevent rotting.
  • Terrariums thrive in natural, indirect light. Avoid placing in direct sunlight or other hot areas as you can actually cook the plants or burn foliage that is touching the edges of the vessel.
  • Mist your terrarium every few days to provide ample humidity.